Kennedy Krieger Institute

1750 Fairmount
Baltimore, MD 21231
(443) 923-7821
www.kennedykrieger.org

Kennedy Krieger Institute provides special education and related services to over 600 day students, aged 4 to 21, across multiple campuses and settings. These programs address the range of learning, emotional, physical, neurological, and developmental disabilities that complicate the student’s ability to participate in a learning environment within their community. Trans-disciplinary comprehensive instruction and all needed related services, provided in a highly-structured environment that assists students to recognize and capitalize on their individual strengths, is the distinguishing design of these programs. Students benefit from relationships with the clinicians and researchers at the Institute and Johns Hopkins Hospital, and the faculty and graduate students of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Education. With its partners, KKS incorporates the latest technology and research in the brain sciences to deliver instruction and related services based on best practice.

Kennedy Krieger Schools (KKS) offer innovative programs and partnerships, including four nonpublic schools, one nonpublic program located within an Anne Arundel County public high school, and four public/private partnership sites within Baltimore City’s public school system. The Institute’s schools include elementary, middle and high schools, a program for students at the most complex end of the autism spectrum, all located in Baltimore, and a Montgomery County campus for middle school students with autism. Public/private partnerships expand KKS’s role in the continuum by providing intensive services in a more integrated, inclusive environment at three Baltimore City elementary schools, offering students the opportunity to receive high quality services in their community. In addition, a partnership with Baltimore City, KKS, and the Kennedy Krieger Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) offers pre-kindergarten instruction for students with autism.